Paleo Bone Broth to Boost Health

Followers of the Paleo and Weston A. Price diets have turned Bone Broth from an outdated staple of many traditional diets into the trendiest morning drink since coffee. Touting dozens of health-boosting benefits, including the easiest way to get more high-protein gelatin, collagen, and other marrow-based nutrients into your diet, bone broth drinkers say a morning “cup o’ bo” can help you trim your waistline, strengthen hair and nails, and enjoy clearer, younger-looking skin. Plus, bone broth is traditionally used to reduce inflammation, and improve skin, gut, and joint health!!

Though it sounds like a strange swap, starting your morning with a cup of bone broth isn’t really that strange at all. Warm and comforting, it offers the same ritualistic benefits of coffee. But the natural fats will keep you satiated longer. Added benefit: you drink bone broth straight, so don’t need to worry about packing on calories with added sugar or cream.

Want to try it? The best way to start is make a huge batch on Saturday or Sunday morning. Bone broth is most beneficial when it cooks for 24-48 hours. So plan on making a large pot at the first of the week, then enjoying it for the rest of the week. Try storing it in mason jars in your fridge, then scooping just what you need into your cup each morning. One batch will easily last a week, making your morning prep simple! Just heat and enjoy.

The finest bone broths should gel up once placed in the fridge. Though you’ll get added nutrients from any bone based broth, the gelled broth indicates an ample presence of gelatin. Our three recipes below are designed to get you batches of hearty, gelled bone broth. Don’t worry, though! You don’t have to sip a hunk of jello. Once heated, the bone broth turns smooth and creamy. 100% sippable from a cup or shot glass OR poach an egg in it to make a simple morning “Miso Soup.”  You can also use the broth in cooking. It’s great for making sauces, soups, and stews. Any savory dish can be benefitted from the addition of bone broth. And your body will enjoy the many benefits, too!

Beef Bone Broth

Beef bones can be found in the freezer section of most health food stores. Alternately, local farmers will often have bags of bones for sale. They are generally inexpensive and easy to acquire. Use high-quality, grass-raised beef bones whenever possible.

2 pounds (bone-in) beef short ribs
1 onion, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
4 stalks celery, chopped
4 sprigs fresh thyme
2 garlic cloves
2 tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
1 tablespoon peppercorns
1 gallon water

Place all ingredients in a large slow cooker or stock pot. Cover and boil on low for 48 hours. During the first 2-5 hours, skim off and discard any impurities or foam that rises to the top of the broth. Allow to cool, then strain through a fine metal strainer into a large bowl. Discard food particles and all bones. Store in glass mason jars and use within 5 days, or freeze in ziplock freezer bags for up to 1 month.

Chicken Bone Broth

Alternatively, a turkey carcass also works well as a swap in this recipe.

1 small whole chicken, free-range (organic if possible)
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 carrots, chopped
4 ounces shiitake mushrooms
4 stalks of celery, chopped
2 tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
1 tablespoon peppercorns
Cayenne pepper to taste
1 gallon water

Place all ingredients in a large stock pot or slow cooker. Cover and boil on low for 24 hours, replace water as needed to keep the water level even throughout the cooking process. During the first 2-5 hours, skim off and discard any impurities or foam that rises to the top of the broth. Remove and let cook, then strain through a fine metal strainer into a large bowl. Discard food particles and all bones or use chicken meat for other recipes. Store in glass mason jars and use within 5 days, or freeze in ziplock freezer bags for up to 1 month.

Beef & Chicken Bone Broth

Combine the benefits of both beef marrow and the gelatinous properties of chicken to create the ultimate broth.

1 pound (bone-in) beef short ribs
1 small whole chicken, free-range (organic if possible)
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 onion, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
4 sprigs fresh dill
4 stalks celery
2 tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
1 tablespoon peppercorns
1 gallon water

Place all ingredients in a large stock pot or slow cooker. Cover and boil on low for 24 hours, replace water as needed to keep the water level even throughout the cooking process. During the first 2-5 hours, skim off and discard any impurities or foam that rises to the top of the broth. Remove and let cook, then strain through a fine metal strainer into a large bowl. Discard food particles and all bones or use chicken meat for other recipes. Store in glass mason jars and use within 5 days, or freeze in ziplock freezer bags for up to 1 month.

Optional Broth Boosters

A few of our favorite flavor combos that taste great no matter which type of broth you’re making! Here are some delicious add-ins that will lend a slight difference of flavor to your broth. We’d love to hear your favorite flavor combos in the comments section below, as well!

FRESH | lemon + fresh rosemary
INDIA SPICE | parsley + curry + garam masala
THAI YUM | ginger + lime + lemongrass
CIAO | basil + tomatoes + garlic
SPA DAY | dill + lemon
AUTUMN WARMTH | rosemary + sage + thyme
SPICY |cayenne pepper + Jalapenos (add during the last 20 minutes of cooking)
TOKYO | scallions + garlic (add during the last 30 minutes of cooking)
VIBRANT | star anise + Fennel Root
PICKLED PETE | dried Fennel + Lemon + Peppercorns
GINGER SPICE | cinnamon sticks + fresh ginger + star anise + cloves + whole nutmeg
TEA TIME | green tea bags + lemon (add tea during the last 5 minutes of cooking)

10 Comments on "Paleo Bone Broth to Boost Health"

  1. Denise  March 15, 2015

    Does store bought low sodium broth have the same healing properties?

    Reply
    • SkinnyMs  March 15, 2015

      Denise, The homemade really has been more nutritional properties. A big batch can last in the fridge for the whole week and also freezes well.

      Reply
  2. sharon  February 20, 2016

    making your own bone broth is too time consuming. Does store bought low sodium broth have any nutritional properties?

    Also, where can you this homemade one? Whole foods nor Trader carry this.

    Sharon

    Reply
    • Gale Compton  February 20, 2016

      Sharon, The store bought versions have some nutritional value but no where near that of the homemade broth. I have not looked at whole foods or Trader Joes but will next time I’m shopping at either one. I’ll be sure to let you know if they sell a healthy version. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Hana  February 23, 2016

    Hi Sharon, both Whole foods and Trader Joes have organic chicken. we buy ours at Costco.

    Reply
  4. Cheryl  May 12, 2016

    When making the Beef or Chicken broth, the ingredients say to use bone in beef short ribs or a whole chicken. Are you actually putting these bones in with the raw meat on them and then removing the meat after it has been cooked for the amount of hours listed in the recipes, or are you only using the bones without the meat? I’m asking because I know you can go to your local butcher or a farmer to get bags of bones, but wasn’t sure if you just use the bones in these recipes or keep the meat on until done an remove everything form the broth.

    Reply
    • Melissa Bump  May 14, 2016

      Cheryl, You can put the meat and/or chicken in whole with the meat on the bones and cook the full time, straining/removing at the end.

      Reply
  5. Penelope  September 12, 2016

    I make bone broth at least once a month. It is not really time consuming, I roast a chicken in the slow cooker (whole frozen 3-4 lb 9-10 hrs while I’m at work), debone and skin it (takes about 15 minutes). I use the meat for salads, eat with pickled jalapenos wrapped in a tortilla or just eat it plain. It’s my “go to” work lunch food. The bones, skin and giblets go into a stock pot, I put rough chopped celery, carrots, onion and garlic in cover with water, add vinegar and put the stock pot in the oven on 175 degrees for 18-24 hours. I check it a couple of times to add more water if necessary. I strain it through cheesecloth and freeze it in 2 cup portions (takes about 20 min). I haven’t bought stock or broth in years. I do the same with pork and beef. I am actually making a combo of beef and pork right now for my pup who has a cracked ulna. I am hoping to help it heal without surgery. So in under 40 minutes of actual labor time I have about 1/2 to 3/4 of a gallon of healthy stock for a few cents!

    Reply
  6. Cameron  May 26, 2017

    Thank you for sharing this recipe, I’ve been meaning to make my own but because I was too busy with work and things I opted for Au Bon Broth. I’ve been drinking it for some time now and I’ve felt better than before. It’s great because I lost having this joint pains I had after giving birth.

    Reply
    • Emilia Horn  May 26, 2017

      Thanks, Cameron! We’re so glad the bone broth is helping you feel better!

      Reply

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