Adopting a Pet? Consider a “Retired” Dog!

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Pet adoption is a big decision, especially if you’ve never had a dog before. If you’re thinking about adding a pooch to your household, you might want to consider a “retired” working dog. Retired dogs are well-trained, well-mannered and often find themselves in need of a loving home once their service years have ended. We’ll discuss three different types of canines and a few helpful retired dog tips to keep in mind as you start the adoption process.

Retired Guide Dogs

Guide dogs loyally serve the blind and disabled for years, often until they are 8 to 10 years old. In many cases, leaving the side of their lifelong partner can be emotionally challenging, especially when the person is unable to continue keeping the dog as a pet. These gentle senior dogs are in need of loving homes, and make wonderful companions for older adults. They’re also a great choice for homes with small children, as guide dogs are trained to be patient and calm even in chaotic circumstances.

Retired Greyhounds

These athletic dogs are used to a life of hard work. Unfortunately, this sometimes includes mistreatment, so retired Greyhounds will appreciate a kind and loving home to retire to. Greyhounds by nature as inquisitive, gentle and sometimes shy, and usually enjoy the company of other Greyhounds. They often have not been introduced to cats or other breeds of dogs, so a retired Greyhound may be ideal if you intend to have a single-pet household. They’re also used to traveling frequently, which is great if you’re looking for a loyal road-trip companion.

Retired K9 and military working dogs

Police K9 units and military working dogs have bravely served our country alongside their handlers for anywhere from 5 to 10 years. Sometimes, they’re injured in the line of duty and need specialized medical consideration. First priority in adopting these very special dogs is usually given to their former trainers and handlers, before opening availability to the public. If you’re interested in adopting a retired service dog, you’ll likely need to complete some training to understand their specific needs and commands. SaveAVet.org is a wonderful resource for learning more about adopting these retired heroes.

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One Comment on "Adopting a Pet? Consider a “Retired” Dog!"

  1. Dog Training Durham  June 15, 2015

    This is a greatly detailed post. Nicely done!

    Reply

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