4 Anti-Aging Foods That Taste Good

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Ewww! We’ve all seen lists of anti-aging foods with options that made us wrinkle our noses. After all, we’re not all wired with taste buds that flip for kelp or oysters. Here’s a list of 4 anti-aging foods that taste good (at least, to most of us):

  1. Yogurt. Women watching their weight tend to cut out dairy products, but the fact is that low-fat dairy is good for the body. Along with bone-building calcium, yogurt offers protein, a key part of the body’s ability to maintain muscle mass. Without enough muscle to burn energy, the metabolism slows down, making it easier to pack on the pounds as we age. Any low-fat, low-sugar yogurt will suit, but Greek yogurt has advantages over the conventional kind. It’s heavily strained, a process that removes much of the liquid whey and sugar. The end result delivers up to a double shot of protein and less sugar.
  2. Salmon. The secret behind salmon’s anti-aging superpower is in its heavy dose of omega 3 fatty acids. These good fats fight the chronic inflammation that plays a role in the development of age-related conditions, like dementia. Salmon is an easy fish to prepare, and even “I don’t like fish” people enjoy its mild taste. For a simple recipe, try Honey-Dijon Glazed Salmon with a Hint of Lemon.
  3. Blueberries. It’s not for nothing that health experts call this berry a superfood. Blueberries are packed with antioxidants, which destroy free radicals, molecules that damage cells and trigger the wrinkles, sags, and bags that add years to our look. Not only are these bite-sized gems tasty, they’re convenient year-round. Buy them fresh during summer months, and, when they’re out of season, keep frozen berries handy to toss into oatmeal, cereal, yogurt or a Blueberry Banana Smoothie.
  4. Dark chocolate. You’ve likely already seen dark chocolate touted as an anti-aging food in magazines and on big name health shows. And they’re right. The cocoa bean—when processed into dark chocolate—is rich in plant nutrients called flavonoids, which repair cell damage. But put aside visions of gorging on the stuff; the Cleveland Clinic suggests eating 1oz (one small square) a couple of times a week [1]—indulge more often and you nick away at your health with too much fat and sugar.

These delish foods are a great place to start when adding anti-aging foods that taste good to your diet—but the world is full of other yummy anti-aging foods that you may be missing out on! So if you’re a selective eater, be daring and try, for example, nutrient-rich kale or collard greens. Who knows? You might just discover your new favorite, good-for-you food.

References

1. http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/prevention/nutrition/chocolate.aspx

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