Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich

Your favorite vegetarian dinner, turned into a sandwich!

It’s everything you love about your favorite vegetarian dinner, made even better! Our Eggplant Parmesan Sandwich has all the flavors and textures you’d expect from the Italian classic. Crispy, oven-fried eggplant slices are covered with sugar-free marinara and melted mozzarella cheese, but we made a few ingredient swaps to keep the fat and calories low. Serve ’em up on whole-wheat ciabatta bread, and you won’t believe each serving has only 300 calories!

I love plating these Eggplant Parmesan Sandwiches as a half sandwich and salad combo when I have guests (or, soup instead of salad if it’s cold outside). It’s also a great excuse to whip up some faux fries or vegetable chips! No matter how you serve it, it’s one of those dishes that’s impressive enough to satisfy the non-dieters in the family. All while keeping you on track with your diet and wellness plan!

Creating the Perfect Oven-Fried Eggplant

Eggplant isn’t always the most popular ingredient on the block. Most people think that eggplant is hard to cook, and honestly, that’s not necessarily untrue. Unlike other vegetables, eggplant does require some treatment before you cook it.

Eggplant flesh is basically a sponge. If you toss it in fryer oil as-is, it’ll soak up all that oil and become soggy! It also oxidizes very quickly (like an apple), but you can’t toss it in acidified water because it’ll soak up a bunch of excess liquid. So, what’s the best way to treat eggplant? Salt!

After you slice the eggplant, place them on a wire rack and sprinkle on the salt. You don’t need to rub it in, but you do want to make sure that each piece gets an even distribution. The salt will draw out the water from the inside of the eggplant, preventing any off-colors while also removing any excess bitterness. It also tenderizes the eggplant, creating a superior texture.

That’s it! You can rinse off the salt after 5 to 10 minutes, just make sure to pat the eggplant slices dry with a paper towel. This step helps the coating stick to the eggplant in the next step!

Oven-Fried is Better Than Oil-Fried

We love fried food alternatives, and oven-frying our food is one of our favorite methods. It tastes just as crispy as oil-fried food, but with significantly less fat. It also doesn’t have the typical greasy, fried aftertaste that tends to weigh you down. That means you’ll get all the flavor without any of the guilt!

Whipping those egg whites helps them coat the eggplant really well, making the panko coating adhere perfectly. That’s why it’s so important to dry the eggplant slices after salting them. If there’s excess water on the eggplant, the egg whites won’t coat the slices the right way.

Then, press them into the whole-wheat breadcrumbs, coating all the sides of the eggplant. Once it hits the 400-degree oven, the already crunchy panko coating will crisp up to perfection. No one will realize these eggplants weren’t deep fried!

We’ve taken your favorite fried foods and turned them into faux fried versions! They’re just as delicious, but with a fraction of the calories. Browse our extensive collection on Pinterest or Instagram.

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Chef Nichole

Nichole has a culinary degree from Great Lakes Culinary Institute and has worked in the culinary industry for 10 years. She also has the knowledge to write recipes using the most nutritious, fresh, and balanced ingredients. Nichole enjoys creating healthy and tasty recipes anyone can prepare, no matter their cooking skill level.

More by Chef Nichole

4 Comments

  1. Eggplant comes in a lot of sizes. Can you specify a weight range?

    Also, can the oven-fried eggplant be frozen for sandwiches later? We do this with breaded chicken breasts and it works very well.

    Thanks,

    1. I would use a large eggplant. Typically Asian (or Japanese) eggplants are smaller and our recipe will specify if an Asian eggplant is needed. Otherwise eggplant are typically similar in size.

      I would not recommend freezing the eggplant as it can become very soggy and does not reheat well from frozen.

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