Hearty Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

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These aren’t your grandmother’s fat-laden oatmeal cookies, but we bet you they’ll taste just as good! You’ll want to savor each and every decadent bite. Plus, they have no cholesterol and are a good way to get some manganese into your clean-eating plan. Enjoy in moderation, though; these are definitely a treat!

Looking to ditch dairy, but can’t nibble cookies without milk? Give one of these Milk Alternatives a try.

Hearty Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Hearty Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Yield: 8 large or 16 small servings | Serving Size: 1 large or 2 small cookies | Calories: 257 | Total Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 0g | Trans Fat: 0g |Cholesterol: 0mg | Sodium: 360mg | Carbohydrates: 45g | Dietary Fiber: 3g | Sugars: 14g | Protein: 13g | SmartPoints (Freestyle): 8

Ingredients

  • 1 cup white whole-wheat flour
  • 1 cup old-fashioned oats
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or other healthy oil, such as safflower)
  • 3 egg whites
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup honey

Instructions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine all dry ingredients. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the wet ingredients. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry mix, and blend well with a wooden spoon. Portion out 16 cookies onto parchment-lined cookie sheets. Bake at 350° for 15 minutes, or until just golden brown.
  2. Note: If these cookies seem hard after baking, simply pack them away overnight in a plastic bag, and they will be quite soft in the morning.
https://skinnyms.com/hearty-oatmeal-raisin-cookies/

30 Comments on "Hearty Oatmeal Raisin Cookies"

  1. Jeannette  June 8, 2013

    The nutritional value for these cookies states 0 grams of total fat. This seems incorrect to me because the coconut oil adds fat to the cookies. Am I missing something?

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  June 9, 2013

      Jeanette, The nutritional data was incorrect. I’ve added the correct values, thanks for letting us know. The total fat is 4 g and saturated fat is 3 g for 1 cookie.

      Reply
  2. MCL  July 12, 2013

    The serving size says 1 cookie, but that there are 8 servings and it makes 16 cookies. Does it make more servings or are the servings 2 cookies?

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  July 13, 2013

      It’s actually: 1 serving = 1 large cookie or 2 small. I updated to reflect these changes. Thanks!

      Reply
  3. cassy  August 1, 2013

    Any chance you could make it even healthier and use almond flour? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  August 1, 2013

      Cassy, I’ve never used almond flour in this recipe but it should be fine. Keep us posted! 🙂

      Reply
    • Nita  September 5, 2013

      I made these with Almond flour and they are great. I also subs Coconut palm sugar for the honey and used chocolate chips instead of raisins

      Reply
      • Skinny Ms.  September 6, 2013

        Nita, Great tips, thanks!

        Reply
      • Kat  June 27, 2018

        I was just wondering about coconut sugar and almond flour (can’t stand most gluten free baking mixes, so almond flour and coconut flour tend to be my go tos), so thanks so much for sharing that it worked. Honey is fine for a lot of things, but I like the smokier, less in-your-face sweetness of coconut sugar so much, too. About to make these now

        Reply
  4. Lisa  August 7, 2013

    Can you replace the oil with applesauce?

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  August 8, 2013

      Lisa, I haven’t so can’t say for sure. Let us know if you give try it…we’d love to know the results.

      Reply
    • SkinnyMs  March 3, 2014

      Yes, you can.

      Reply
  5. Amy  August 13, 2013

    These look great! If I were to use xylitol instead of honey, what other changes do you think I would have to make? And roughly how much xylitol would suffice? Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  August 14, 2013

      Amy, I’m not that familiar with xylitol. I googled it and found that a 1:1 ratio is used in place of other sweeteners. When using in place of honey, use 1 additional tablespoon of xylitol.

      Reply
  6. Kathy  September 7, 2013

    You might want to recalculate the grams of protein. At best, the protein in one large cookie would be about 6 grams. I'm interested in making these oatmeal cookies. I've never tried making them with coconut oil before.

    Reply
  7. Emily Andersen Harmon  October 30, 2013

    Do you think these would be just as good with Oat flour?

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  October 31, 2013

      Emily, I’ve never used oatmeal flour for this recipe so I can’t say for sure. Keep me posted!

      Reply
  8. job  October 30, 2013

    Any way to make these vegan?

    Reply
    • SkinnyMs  March 3, 2014

      Use 1/4 cup canola oil or other vegetable oil for every 2 egg whites. Use maple syrup in place of the honey. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  9. job  October 30, 2013

    Is there a way to make this vegan?

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  October 31, 2013

      You could sub the eggs with Ener-G brand or Bob’s Red Mill…both egg replacements in baking.

      Reply
  10. Beth  October 31, 2013

    I used regular whole wheat flour – very hearty. These would be awesome with grated apple or carrot. I'll do that next time!

    Reply
  11. Tara  February 23, 2014

    I am new to using coconut oil. Should you melt it first or use it straight out of the jar?

    Reply
    • SkinnyMs  February 27, 2014

      If it is thick melt it first over a low temp and then add. If the house is warm, the coconut oil will already be a liquid.

      Reply
  12. Karen  March 9, 2014

    I am not sure why coconut oil is better than butter. Aren't their nutritional values similar? Any assistance would be appreciated.

    Reply
  13. Kat  May 27, 2014

    These are amaziiinnnnggg!!! Subbed the honey for a smashed over ripe banana and about 1/4 C raw sugar. They are soft, dense, and I totally ate some for breakfast.

    Reply

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